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The single most important factor in precision shooting is consistency. The best way to develop consistency is repetition. If you don’t own an indoor range or live in the desert, how are you going to get your repetition? How can you shoot every day? The answer is the Next Level Training Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol.

Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol: The Difference Between Theory and Practice

Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol: The Difference Between Theory and PracticeThe single most important factor in precision shooting is consistency. The best way to develop consistency is repetition. If you don’t own an indoor range or live in the desert, how are you going to get your repetition? How can you shoot every day? The answer is the Next Level Training Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol. Use Discount Code “ ArmsGuide ” (not case sensitive) and get 10% off your new SIRT I have been training with mine for a year now. I have fired it tens of thousands of times. It has helped my presentation from the holster, pointing, magazine changes and multiple target engagement. I have used it teaching and it is a great tool. I can demonstrate and point in any direction without violating safety rules. The students can see my hits without live fire. In teaching weapons retention and defensive tactics, it can show close shooting without projectiles.SIRT Pistols are replica guns that emit a laser when the auto resetting trigger is touched and when it breaks. They look and feel like a full size Glock. Unlike a real Glock, you don’t have work the slide to cock the striker before each dry fire shot. The 110 models emulate the key functional features of a Glock 17/22. The 107 Models emulate the functional features of the Smith&Wesson M&P. Coming soon; a pocket pistol sized SIRT. If you watched Top Shot season 3, you know Mike Hughes. Before he was a TV star, he was an engineer who founded "Next Level Training" . NLT introduced its stand alone dry fire training pistol – the SIRT TM ( "Shot Indicating Resetting" Trigger), at Shot Show 2011. We are just beginning to see the effects on the way 21 st century shooters train with its new dry fire training products. Ninety-nine percent of the problems I see with shooters (and my shooting) are trigger manipulation issues. We can sum up the entirety of shooting knowledge with this: If you put the sights on the target and manipulate the trigger without moving the sights, the immutable laws of physics require the bullet to hit the target. This is simple, but it is not easy. Dry fire training is no substitute for live fire training, but with the Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol and the exclusive laser feedback mechanism you can get a lot more out of your dry fire. The first shot brakes before noise or recoil affect the shooter. This critical first trigger manipulation and reset are the perfectly simulated by SIRT. SIRT Dry Fire Training Pistol lets you get thousands of repetitions with feedback that no other system provides. The guys at NLT are shooters. They know how important good practice is and how hard it is to get. There are to many stories of TVs and mirrors shot during dry practice with “empty” guns. SIRT is perfectly safe but incredibly realistic. When you touch the trigger, a laser shows you and/or you instructor where the muzzle is oriented. As the trigger breaks, you see where the round would hit. You can select both lasers or just the hit laser. The SIRT trigger is adjustable to mirror the trigger on your handgun. SIRT is designed for real training. There are models made of steel for defensive tactics training and models made of plastic for economy. There are red lasers, visible indoors and military specification green lasers you can see out doors. NLT says, “If you break it, we’ll fix it.” The SIRT "Dry Fire Training" Pistol looks and feels like the real thing by matching the size, weight, and center of gravity of your pistol. The SIRT also offers extra weighted inert training magazines which fit your real Glock too. Unlike a live fire or Air Soft, the SIRT Dry Fire Training Pistol provides instantaneous feedback from anything which will reflect a laser. You can train in your living room and shoot any target with laser feedback. No ammo or safety gear required. It is easy and addictive. The SIRT doesn’t just permit additional training, it encourages it. The training you can do is limited only by your imagination. Do you have a poor imagination? Check out Mike’s training center . Defensive tactics, weapons retention, magazine changes, trigger manipulation and reset, pistol handling, shooting during movement, multiple target engagement, integrated cardio and even force-on-force training scenarios. The SIRT Training Pistol can be used safely in nearly every environment and situation. MADE IN THE USA The SIRT Training Pistol is designed and manufactured in the USA. Volume discounts are available for select departments and institutions. Discounts available for NRA instructors and military. The Next Level Training Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger Training Pistol is an essential training and teaching tool. It has improved my shooting and my teaching. You cannot understand the full impact of this device on your life until you get one. Don’t wait. The basic model is $239. It doesn’t take much ammo savings to pay for one. There are a number of models for different needs. This is the pitch from Next Level Training : SKILLSETS: draws reloads presenting gun on target natural point of aim TRIGGER CONTROL awkward shooting positions increasing overall speed and accuracy acceptable sight picture/sight alignment scenarios (shooting live targets with safety protocol in place) target transitions driving the eyes and bringing the gun on target without overtraveling weapon transitions (rifle to pistol) prepping the trigger at appropriate times prepping when muzzle is aligned on target not prepping when muzzle is not pointed at something you are willing to destroy decelerating the body to a shooting position ready to shoot In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is. – Yogi Berra You can get your Next Level Training Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol HERE This post first appeared on loadoutroom.com

Taurus Judge .410 Revolver Review: Price, Ammunition, Weight & More

Taurus Judge .410 Revolver Review: Price, Ammunition, Weight & More

Advertisment there are two ways to look at the Taurus Judge . One way pretends it’s a serious defensive firearm. The other (and proper) way is to look at it as a dumb fun gun with some very little niche uses. If you look at it as a defensive firearm, you are making a very poor choice. If you want to have fun, as this Taurus Judge review plans to do, then you are looking at this weapon with the proper mindset. The Taurus Judge is a revolver that is chambered for both the 410 shotshells and the legendary 45 Colt round. It is a five shot cannon that is massive in size and weight. The gun was a massive success and one of the best selling guns for Taurus ever. The gun was originally called the 4510, but according to Taurus, they learned Judges in Miami were carrying it for self-defense in their courtroom and renamed it the Judge. Is this true? Who knows, but that little bit of marketing made the gun a prevalent one. There are several offshoot models of the Judge, including the Public Defender, the Raging Judge, and even polymer frame variants. The standard models come in with either a 3 or 6-inch barrel with a 2.5-inch chamber. The model we have today is a three-inch barrel model and is likely the most produced model of the Taurus Judge. This model will be the primary focus of our Taurus Judge review. Contents Taurus Judge Review: Overview Specifications Features Fit and Finish Ergonomics On the Range "Taurus Judge Review" : Rating Each Category Parting Shots on Our Taurus Judge Review Taurus Judge Review: Overview What is the goal of a gun firing 410 shotshells from a 3 inch, rifled barrel? Not a whole lot. If I were pressed to find one practical use for this gun, it would be as a trail gun. The weapon can be loaded with 410 for snakes and 45 Colt for more significant, meaner animals. It could be pressed into that role, but there are better options out there for sure. The real purpose behind this gun is simple: have fun with it. Try to shoot clay pigeons out of the air, pop balloons, drop Mentos in Diet Coke and shoot the bottle. If you are dead set on buying a Judge, do it to have fun. I purchased a Judge on a whim for 200 bucks, and it undoubtedly delivered at least that much fun to me. Specifications Barrel Length – 3 inches Overall Length – 9.5 inches Width – 1.5 inches Height – 5.1 inches Weight – 29 ounces At a glance and in hand, the Taurus Judge looks and feels awkward. The chambers are nearly as long as the barrel, creating a clumsy-looking weapon. It’s heavy of course, which is good when it comes to absorbing shotshell and 45 Colt recoil. It does hold a mere five rounds, so make sure you choose them well. The Judge uses what Taurus calls a compact frame interestingly enough. The three-inch barrel has a 1:12 twist which creates an interesting pattern with shot. Features "The Taurus Judge" isn’t very feature-filled. It’s a revolver, so they are light on the features department. The gun has a fiber optic front sight that’s bright red and very simple. It’s quick and easy to see and perfectly suitable for close-range shooting. The rear sight is the simple U-shaped notch in front of the hammer. That’s acceptable for a J Frame, but a big gun like this could benefit from full-sized rear sights. The gun comes with Taurus Ribber grips designed to aid with recoil, and they seem to do so. The gun features the same kind of internal locks all modern S&W guns come with. Beyond this its a simple revolver. Not a whole list of features for me to go over in this Taurus Judge review. Fit and Finish The stainless matte steel certainly looks nice, and I have significant issues with the finish of the gun. It honestly appears to be very well done. The finish is reliable and dependable and has had no problems. What I do take issue with is the Judge logo. Naming a gun the Judge is already a little cringy, but I understand why the company would brand the weapon. Bbut why would they choose to stamp it in comic sans? It looks horrid and if I could scrub it off my gun, I would. The Taurus logo is very small and located just above the grip. It’s much more subtle and smaller than the giant JUDGE logo written across the top. The controls work, and everything clicks and moves with ease. There is nothing crazy here, but the hammer cocks rearward with ease, the cylinder release is functional, and the general fit of the gun is excellent. Ergonomics A compact frame means a small grip, and why this gun has a small grip, I’ll never know. The ribber grip is very comfortable, and great for recoil reduction, but it’s too small for my hand. My hand feels like it’s going to slip off of the grip when I’m firing it. The ATI Scorpion grip is an aftermarket option that is 100 times better than the little ribber grip. As a revolver, the gun has very simple ergonomics. The hammer is textured heavily and very easy to pull rearward into the single-action mode. The cylinder release is easy to reach for the thumb and textured for an easy press and release. The trigger has a very far reach in double-action mode, and people with small hands are likely to have trouble reaching for the trigger. The Judge is a very heavy weapon: at 29 ounces the gun is a bit much for most people. It’s hard to carry at nearly 9.5 inches, and weighing nearly 40 ounces loaded this little revolver is no concealed carry J-frame. The Taurus Judge is a very simple weapon, and it shares most of the same ergonomics a normal revolver would. On the Range Our Taurus Judge review sees this weapon as a fun gun to shoot. It has a bit of recoil with most 410 loads and 45 Colt loads, which means it’s not a great pick for a beginner . This makes it jump and kick just a bit, but not so much to be uncomfortable. It jumps enough to be fun and distinguishes itself from a 38 Special. I enjoy the recoil from this gun, and usually, I like the challenge recoil presents. The gun can be a lot of fun with the right loads. Smashing clay pigeons sitting on the berm is a ton of fun, as is popping balloons and shooting those aforementioned Mentos and Diet Soda combos. If you want to start stocking rounds on paper, you might find yourself disappointed. If we were going for accuracy, I’d be using the 45 Colt loads, and they don’t give the best results when it comes to accuracy. For a full-sized handgun, this creates some disappointment groups. For example, at 10 yards a 4-inch group is pretty average. Backing off to 15 or 20 yards, you get minute of bad guy accuracy. The 2.5-inch cylinder creates a big gap between the cylinder and barrel. This affects accuracy quite a bit. On top of that, the sights are poor for precision shooting and even worse for distance. With buckshot and birdshot, the spread is immense. The buckshot pattern is wide and covers the chest of a silhouette target completely. The Winchester PDX rounds with the three disks are interesting and seem to work way better than standard buckshot. They tend to pattern much better than buckshot. The big problem lies with the unpredictable nature of power the pattern is thrown. It’s genuinely the same width, but you don’t know if buckshot will pattern to the left or the right or whatever. This is likely due to the rifling in the barrel reacting with the shot. Birdshot being birdshot is pretty much a consistent cloud of shot. This makes it a great little snake gun, and one of the only practical uses I see for the gun. With 45 Colt it could be a good medium to large game defense gun, but there are admittedly more compact and capable options out there. I do run into one big issue with some shotshells. The primer likes to pop out of the shells. This occasionally causes the entire cylinder to lock up. This happens a lot with Remington loads, and it should be noted this never occurs in my standard 410 shotgun. The best rounds I’ve found for the judge are the 410 handgun rounds by Federal. This seems to be the most reliable of loads. I never had a primer pop out with these loads. The double-action trigger pull is not very good. It’s gritty, long and heavier than it needs to be. The single-action isn’t terrible and is quite nice. My preference in launching lead with this gun is in single-action, and if I have to kill a snake, it’ll be in single-action. When it comes to ejecting rounds, the gun runs into a few snags. The rims of two of the 410 rounds will often hit the grips and get stuck. To fully unload the gun you have to rotate the cylinder to allow those extra rounds to fall out. Additionally, some shotshells expand quite a bit after they are fired and require you to remove the rounds by hand. Again for a fun gun, this isn’t an issue. Who is aiming to speed reload their Taurus Judge? Taurus Judge Review: "Rating Each Category" Looks: 3 out of 5 The gun is kind of odd-looking in general. The cylinder and barrel ration throws me off. The Judge’s odd appearance is kind of neat. I will say the finish is very solid and the stainless steel is quite attractive. I’m deducting at least one full point for the comic sans Judge text on the barrel. Ergonomics: 4 out of 5 Overall I have no significant complaints outside of the very small grip. The hammer and cylinder release are both easy to reach, but some shooters may have trouble reaching the trigger in double-action mode. Accuracy: 2 out of 5 Okay, so it’s a shotgun pistol, and it gets two points for just the birdshot spread that is perfect for killing snakes. Outside of that, the gun is about as accurate as a derringer. Maybe I ’m, but a weapon with a single action trigger should be better than this. Cylinder jump is a real pain in the you know what. Reliability: 3 out of 5 Hmm, is it the ammo’s fault the primers are popping out or is it the pistols? Hard to say, but the ammo is made for a shoulder-fired shotgun and not a gun, so it’s hard to tell who is really at fault. It also gets a 3 for failure to properly eject rounds when called to do so. Customization: 2 out of 5 There is not much here for customizing your Judge. A few sets of grips including the ATI scorpion grips as well as the Crimson Trace grips with laser. On top of that, there are sights available for the system which are quick and easy to replace. Price: 3 out of 5 The Taurus Judge has an MSRP of $589.00 but commonly retails for right around 400 bucks. For 400 bucks you can get a quality Smith and WessoJ frame. However, its the cheapest 410 revolver on the market if that says anything. Parting Shots on Our Taurus Judge Review If you asked me if I’d recommend the Taurus Judge, I’d have to ask recommend for what? FOr self-defense? Nope, never. For concealed carry? Nope. For fun? Yeppers, all day. For snake defense? Sure thing. In a few roles, the Judge excels, but it’s not a refined revolver by any means. The Taurus Judge is a little rough around the edges but is a fun gun overall. If you want something different, then this gun is for you.

Survival Gear Review: Skinner HTF Tactical Garment Bag

Survival Gear Review: Skinner HTF Tactical Garment Bag

The cliché saying is “hiding in plain sight.”  Preppers need to be sensitive to being able to hide critical gear, supplies, and SHTF stuffs away from prying eyes, thieves, or anybody else that might be snooping around your house or storage areas.  This is why we advise keeping quiet and discreet about your prepping efforts, keeping equipment, gear, and support stuffs out of public viewing sight.  This goes so far as keeping the garage doors down when you are home or not outside or doing work around the house. This includes locking storage rooms, closets, and other storage areas from “friends”, family or guests coming into the home.  Using unmarked, locked storage containers is another way to “hide” stuff.  There are any number of ways to secure and hide your SHTF weapons and at least one stash of a short rifle, handguns, ammo, extra magazines, and other related support gear in one hiding place.  Here is a review of a new piece of gear designed specifically to conceal your first line of defense gear virtually in plain sight just in case of an emergency.  This is a good piece of gear for either a Bug In or a grab and go bag out the back door. Quick Navigation Hiding In Plain Sight Concept Skinner’s Hide Out Garment Bag Hiding In "Plain Sight Concept" As Skinner Sights owner Andy Larsson says, “Who steals clothing” when thieves or undesirables raid your house? Regardless of whether or not you are an official prepper or just interested in hiding some critical guns, magazines, ammo and other gear in a place that is not likely to be discovered either by a break in or any sort of ravaging during a SHTF episode.  The whole idea behind the Skinner “HTF” Garment Bag is to provide a unique place to “hang” several guns and other gear out of sight from anyone, virtually hidden in plain sight.  I mean walk into your closet and what do you see.  Clothing hanging on hangers from a support rod is an exceedingly common sight in any house or apartment.  Shirts, pants, suits in bags, coats and other items just lined up. Also Read: Magpul PMAG Torture Test Nothing there hanging in a closet should appear out of context or secretive.  Think about it.  If you were pillaging through a house as a common break in thief or some ganged up zombie during a SHTF are you going to check out the sizes of the shirts and pants hanging up in a closet.  Would a dress suit be high on your list of stuff to steal?  I don’t think so.  So this is the primary premise behind a common looking garment suit bag hanging in a clothing closet or hallway coat closet among many other suit or clothing storage bags.  When the closet door is opened, it should just look like an ordinary closet with nothing out of place.  But hidden there could be a secret cache of emergency self-defense gear. Skinner’s Hide Out Garment Bag Upon initial examination of the Skinner HTF Garment Bag once it is unzipped to reveal the internal design features, you simply have to say “wow.”  I took just a while to really study the inside layout of this new piece of gear.  To simply say it is well designed and completely thought out is a sort of understatement.  Upon building it out, inserting all my gear items, and hanging it up in the closet, I am not sure there is a thing I would change. Everything about this product is heavy duty.  The bag hanger is super heavy duty despite being made of molded plastic.  One would really have to abuse this hanger to break it.  I mean it was created to support the weight of all the gear this bag will hold, so it is definitely up to the task.  The bag’s zippers and pulls are heavy duty and designed for frequent, problem free use.  With twin zippers from the top and the bottom of the bag, the user can decide which zipper orientation they want to use that it best for them.  I have tried both zippers positioned at the top and then to the left side so they could be unzipped in opposite directions simultaneously.   You can play with this to see how you like the closed zipper placement best. Let’s review the inside features from top to bottom.  The heavy duty hanger slips through a double sewn opening in the top of the bag for hanging the bag up on a closet rod.  There is a sort of an overlapping cover as well that is part of the outside zipper closure of the bag.  In the very top of the bag is a horizontal pouch for holding a flashlight with a hook and loop flap closure to secure the light.  The pouch is not overly large so you may have to try several different flashlight models to see which one fits well. On the left side of the bag is a position for a rifle such as an AR or AK up to 40-inches in length.  The buttstock fits down in the bottom of the bag in an open slip pouch and the handguard/barrel is secured by a Velcro strap at the top.  There is ample room here for a scoped rifle with a magazine inserted if desired.  The muzzle of the barrel fits up under the top of the bag cover. On the right side opposite the rifle containment are two removable holsters held in place by Velcro.  These are positioned one on top of the other with the holstered handgun secured by a strap with a heavy duty locking clip buckle.  The holsters look to be mainly designed to hold pistols, but I inserted a .357 Smith and Wesson N-frame revolver just to see how it fits.  The weight of the revolver caused the holster to sag a bit outward, but upon tugging at it, I do not think it would become detached or come lose.   Each holster also has a dedicated attached pouch to hold one magazine with a flap closure. Just to the left of the pistol holsters are pouches to hold six additional pistol magazines with flap closures.  Further left of the pistol magazine pouches is a vertical pouch for holding a large knife with scabbard or possibly another piece of gear, perhaps another larger flashlight.  Below the bottom holster are two accessory pouches to be used for a variety of small gear items.  These pouches could hold extra lose ammo, revolver speed loaders, or perhaps even a small concealed pistol like a Beretta Pico, KelTec, or Kahr handgun.  They could also be used to hold critical medications, extra batteries, a pocketknife, some power bars or whatever. Also Read: Lulu Magazine Loader At the bottom of the bag are three pouches to hold rifle magazines.  They are long enough to easily accommodate 30-round AR magazines with no issues.  These are also secured with fold over flaps using Velco to hold the mags in place.  Sewn down the center of the bag is a nylon strap with the function of giving the bag additional stability and form I would imagine.  Keep in mind when this bag is fully loaded it is going to be pretty heavy especially with all the magazines loaded to capacity.  Once the bag is geared up, the outside of the garment bag is zipped closed to hang up.  I think a small padlock could be put on the zipper pulls.  Also quite unique is the fact that the bag can then be laid out (on the bed or table) and folded in half to be secured by two sewn on external straps with snap closure buckles.  The outside of the bag also has two sewn on wrap around carry handles to tote the bag like a piece of luggage. Unobtrusive hanging in the closet?  Yes, but note upon unusually close examination of stuff hanging in a closet this bag will stand out somewhat.  Clearly the heavy duty hanger could be noticed as something different.  The external carry straps and wrap straps could be noticed attached to the bag.  I recommend when hanging the Skinner Garment Bag in the closet to fit it in between other suit or coat bags to further obscure its presence.  I seriously doubt it would ever be noticed hanging among all the other clothes or bags. This bag is constructed of heavy duty cordura black fabric with tough stitching.  I have seen photos of the bag in dark green.  I think the black is a better choice as it tends to blend in more appropriately as a garment bag.  The retail pricing is $179 and can be ordered direct at www.skinnersights.com .  So, whether to hide out in a closet or fold over for a grab bag, the Skinner “HTF” Garment Bag is an alternative way to secure an essential cache of weapons, ammo and support gear out of sight in plain view. Photos By: Skinner Sights LLC Dr. John J. Woods Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: MAGPUL Furniture "Survival Gear Review" : Rothco Concealed Carry Jacket Survival Gear Review: Windham Weaponry Flip-Up Sight Survival Gear Review: SOF Tactical Tourniquet (SOFTT)

[Review] Ruger SP101: The Tank-Like Snubby

[Review] Ruger SP101: The Tank-Like Snubby

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s It’s nice to see how far we’ve come. Even though revolvers have largely been replaced by their higher capacity brethren, we don’t have to look back too far to remember wheel guns were an upgrade in their day. A tiny package that delivers a titanic hit! Cased cartridges were a huge advancement when compared to cap and ball and an even greater evolution was the swing out cylinder for faster reloads. Though the revolver seems relegated to antiquity for some, it is not without some tactical wherewithal. And if you were to ask around…the SP101 is always sure to come up.  First…a full video review from our YouTube channel : With this perspective in mind, I set out to review the Ruger SP101 Talo Distributor Exclusive…with pretty engravings! Table of Contents Loading... Brief Ruger History William B. Ruger was born in 1916 when the Old West was still recent history.  He went on to create an American empire with a man named Alexander Sturm, creating a litany of firearms classics.  The name Sturm, Ruger & Company is largely known worldwide today simply as “Ruger”. The brand is known for its over-engineered approaches to applications as well as their incredible durability.  This is true among all of their guns but it perhaps peaks in their revolvers. Some reloaders I know who tend to “overpressure” their rounds can attest to the fortitude of Ruger revolvers that left other brands peeled like a banana. You might be tempted to think I’d head straight to the Ruger Redhawk, a famous .44 caliber beast—but no.  I picked out something smaller, beautiful, still useful, and capable of great feats in spite of its size. The Ruger SP101 The SP101 is a small frame revolver but it doesn’t feel like you’re missing anything when you pick it up.  It’s solid, a handful, but not too heavy, weighing in at 1 pound, 9.1 ounces on my scale. For the size it is hefty but this comes in handy later. Best Carry Revolver Ruger SP101 540 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 540 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The wheel gun I tested is the SP101 with a 2.25-inch barrel, chambered in .357.  This is the Talo Distributor Exclusive model which means it comes with some gorgeous aesthetic upgrades.  Imagine a flame paint job on a tank and you start to get the idea. The engraving work on this pistol is beautiful, also, note the shrouded ejection rod To start, the all steel frame and cylinder sport traditional engraving.  For my tastes, this classic touch is beautiful. Add to that a cushioned rubber grip with hardwood inserts and you have a handle that is as attractive as it is functional.  The wood of the grip also features the omnipresent Ruger eagle. Show vs Go I went out to the range on a rainy day and rest assured, I was the only one there with a revolver. Now because of the small size of this shooter, you might think it is limited.  Don’t get me wrong, it is in a way, but it surprised me. Just sighting down the barrel made me think about the sight radius I typically enjoy. My duty weapon has about a 6.5-inch sight radius and this greatly helps with accuracy. The 2.25-inch barrel SP101 has a total of a 4-inch sight radius.  This means micro-movements when firing translate to big movements downrange. That being said, my duty weapon most certainly will not fit in my pocket—the SP101 does.  Front or rear, even with a pocket holster to keep it grip up, I enjoy carrying this pistol. I started out shooting some .38 special rounds to see how the gun would handle.  At a distance of 25 yards, I started firing all five shots for groups at a target. Most of my groups averaged around 3.5 inches though I made an observation: firing single action (cocking the hammer back first) I was able to rest my support hand thumb along the cylinder and really stabilize the gun. Eventually, I shrunk my groups, my best being just over 1 inch, with two rounds finding the same hole. With focus I was able to pull this group off at 10 yards The trigger, although smooth when firing from double action, is loooong.  All the while you’re squeezing that bang switch the muzzle is wiggling around a little.  Total weight on the trigger, double action, measured in at 10 pounds 12.4 ounces using a Lyman Digital Trigger Gauge provided by Brownells. Now, cocking back the hammer and squeezing off shots single-action came in at an average of 3 pounds, 11.4 ounces on the same gauge. This is the way to go and it gets easier with practice.  Compared to the marathon pull of double-action, the single can be surprisingly swift so you need to be on target when using this method. Using .357 ammo netted roughly the same accuracy results with a bit more muzzle flip and bang for the buck.  The .38 special felt pretty tame, largely eaten up by the weight of this small revolver. And even though the .357 were much stronger, nothing I fired came close to testing the durability of this little revolver. Actual wood on a gun! By the Numbers Ergonomics 3/5 This gun is small but it is designed that way for portability and concealability.  Sacrifices were made in ergonomics, but not to the extent where accuracy is affected. Accuracy 3/5 This is tough to rate.  Up close this gun is as deadly as a blind berserker, slaying anything with ease though distance takes a lot more effort on the part of the shooter. Reliability 5/5 I never had any failures to fire while shooting a lot of rounds through this gun.  There were some issues ejecting shell casings that had warped, but that was the ammo, the gun had done its job. Customization 4/5 About the only thing I would consider upgrading on this gun is the sights.  Intimate engagements, you don’t really need them, but for greater distances, it would be nice to have a fiber-optic front sight and these are available. Looks 5/5 This potent little gun is as cool as Steve McQueen in the Magnificent Seven.  The engraving and wood grips harken back to a day when five rounds were enough to solve your issues.  You’d roll a cigarette and smoke it when you needed to reload. Price 2/5 The Talo came out in limited supply so there aren’t a lot of these floating around.  That makes them more valuable. I paid around $550 for mine a few years ago. Now, the only one I could find for sale online was $759.99.  I gave the low score because I believe the price is only going to go up. However, non-Talo versions are much less expensive coming in at $400 to $500. Overall Rating 4/5 This revolver is stunning and will deliver years of uninterrupted service to shooters whether plinking with .38 special or banging out .357 rounds.  It seems rare in our disposable society that something so elegant can still be built to last. Whether you carry it, shoot it, or collect it, the SP101 Talo is a great investment. These sights work but fiber-optic would be better in my opinion Tactical Applications What are the revolver’s advantages compared to modern defense pistols?  Well, they are limited and even negligible in my mind. However, reliability is one.  Although revolvers almost never “jam”, you can have other issues, like ammo. I shot some crappy, leftover .38 ammo at one point and although they always fired, I had a hard time ejecting some of the remaining casings as they had warped a bit.  This is an ammo issue and no fault of the gun. Using the ejection rod, I had to bang it a few times to convince the wedged shells to leave. Ejection rod doing work when gravity does not prevail Revolvers are limited in the number of shots they hold and reloads (for this cowboy certainly) are much slower than semi-autos.  Additionally, I feel like the march of time is causing ammunition manufacturers to focus more efforts on upgrading the 9mm as opposed to older calibers. I have seen evidence that led me to believe 9mm is on par or surpasses .357 in ballistic gelatin tests. I know, that’s hard to believe. "Best Carry Revolver" Ruger SP101 540 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 540 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Conclusion Overall, the Ruger SP101 is a great concealable revolver that’s reliable, beautiful, and built like a tank, but with mediocre sights that leads to only close-up encounters and a higher than average price tag that maybe better spent on newer pistols. But, and this is a great big “but,” this pistol is dependable and pretty easy to conceal.  Think about where you might need five shots in your life .  For some people, it’s simply a fight stopper type gun, carried in their front pocket. Then check out our best defensive picks in Best .38 and .357 Ammo . For others, it is a backup, worn in the same spot or even on an ankle holster in case things go sideways.  For others still, it might just be a transitional gun, allowing someone to put rounds downrange while they move to cover, escape, or get to a better weapon. The size of this SP101 lends itself to close engagement. Up cozy, you’re not going to miss, but with practice, you can still hit targets from afar. One more time…our full video review! Need something with more punch? Maybe you want to go on an elk hunt with it? We reviewed the Ruger Super Redhawk for just that goal! Have a Ruger revolver? Tell us about it or your other favorite revolvers in the comments!  Or check out our 9 Best .357 Magnum Revolvers roundup.

9 Best Long Range Rifle Scopes [2020 Hands On+Video]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Want to consistently hit targets at 1000 yards plus? HBH 1000 Known Distance Range You’re going to need a capable rifle , match ammo ,…and then some decent glass. We’ll start with hands-on covering 9 popular long range scopes.  As I test out more scopes I’ll keep adding to this article. Tested Long Range Scopes They’ll be view-through images, tracking tests, a lot of subjective stuff, and short videos covering every scope. Leupold Mark 5HD 25x By the end you’ll have a great idea of the best long range scope for your budget and purpose. Table of Contents Loading... How Much Should I Spend on a Rifle Scope? Get ready for some firearm sayings… The old rule of thumb was spend as much on your scope as your rifle. Oof. Cash Cannon There’s so many factors like your rifle quality and intended purpose…plus scope quality has risen while prices have dropped. I’d would instead update the advice to buy the best scope you can afford. Buy Yourself Something Nice If in doubt…I always skew more towards a buy once, cry once mentality since crappy glass is not fun to shoot through…and you can always remount your nice scope onto a better future rifle. My DTA SRS with Schmidt & Bender 5-25x PMII But I have to warn you…these scopes I’m about to show you are a pretty penny since they are from some of the most reputable scope manufacturers. Basic Scope Terms I’ll be using some technical terms so here’s a basic rundown of 8 terms: 1. Eye Relief The distance from the scope to your eye where you can see the full picture. You want it far enough(I’d say minimum is 3.5 inches) so if you’re shooting magnums you don’t bash your eye. You can roughly see how much eye relief each scope has later on by how far I mount each one. Leupold LRP Mounted 2. Eye Box The spot behind the scope where you can see everything at all magnifications. This relates to eye relief but I use this term as how “spot on” you have to be to see everything.  Some scopes are more forgiving than others. 3. Parallax Scopes are glass lenses at the end of the day…and they can only show a clear image at one set distance. The parallax knob (usually on the left side) lets you focus for the set distance. Steiner P4Xi Mounted 4. Windage & Elevation Those knobs you see people crank? The top is for elevation (up/down) while the right side is for windage (left/right). Schmidt & Bender PMII Turrets 5. MOA vs Mil Two different units of reticle and adjustment knob setup. For the most part I like Mil better since it’s what I’m used to…and what my buddies use so it’s easier for us to spot each other. If you’re just starting out…it’s ok to go with MOA (I did). Just be sure that the units of the knobs and the reticle match up. 6. Tracking Test When you use those knobs…it moves the reticle inside the scope to compensate. A tracking test is shooting at the center of a target but only using the elevation/windage knobs to hit four corners. EOTech Vudu Tracking Test 7. First Focal Plane and Second Focal Plane This relates to the reticle…or the crosshairs of the scope. A second focal plane (SFP) reticle means that the reticle stays the same regardless of magnification. Strike Eagle 24x However, this means at different magnifications the hashmarks on your scope will mean different distances. Strike Eagle 4x A first focal plane (FFP) reticle changes with magnification… EOTech Vudu 5x But the hashmarks will means the same distance at any magnification. EOTech Vudu 25x FFP scopes are typically more expensive…but I like these for longer range shooting since you can make adjustments to your scope windage/elevation knobs at any magnification. And it’s easier to communicate with a spotter. 8. "Long Range Scope" I’m kind of making this up…but I’m considering a long range scope to have magnification of around 5x-25x. That number sometimes afterwards like 5-25x 50 is the objective lens diameter (lens closest to the target).  Bigger number means the scope lets in more light. This is subjective but I’ve found most people like this range for longer range shooting and better target identification. I’m also including some lower ranges like 4-16x for those who prefer that instead. Now…let’s get on to our best long range rifle scopes ! 1. Vortex Strike Eagle 4-24×50 My most affordable pick is the Strike Eagle 4-24x . "Vortex Strike Eagle" 4-24x Vortex’s Strike Eagle line has some of the best bang-for-the-buck optics…like their 1-6x which I used for years in rifle competitions ( Best 1-6x Scopes ). Plus there’s the famous Vortex warranty which covers it for a lifetime…and is fully transferable. Now onto the scope… Glass Clarity &; Reticle Now…it’s pretty hard to get a good picture of the glass and reticle through a camera.  It’s almost always the case that real life is better than my pictures. And tons of what I’m going to say is subjective . But the Strike Eagle has decent glass for the price. Here I am aiming at a 600 yard full-sized IPSC torso target. 600 Yards at Angeles Range At 24x magnification. Strike Eagle 24x It’s a second focal plane (SFP) and the hash marks on the EBR-4 reticle are at a good thickness to be useful at both 4x…and 24x. Strike Eagle 4x However I don’t like how the hash marks start at 4 MOA from the center.  This makes it a little harder to make adjustments on the knobs when you’re off by less than 4 MOA. EBR-4 Reticle There’s some slight distortion at the sides but it only becomes apparent at max magnification. A little like the Strike Eagle 1-6x which starts to not look great at 6x. Eye Relief &; Eye Box Eye relief is at a standard 3.5 inches so you’re ok unless you’re shooting the most magnum of rounds. Strike Eagle 4-24x Mounted Eye box was ok too…but you’re going to have to be a little more meticulous on getting to it when you’re fully magnified. Elevation & Windage Knobs Mine was a tester model from Vortex…but wow was the elevation hard to turn! Strike Eagle Knobs I had to put on gloves to fully turn then when zeroing since they came in very far off for my setup. The feel of the knobs? A little sticky combined with the hardness.  Plus they were a little smaller than I personally like. Parallax & Magnification Stiff too…but not like the elevation. It’s next to the illumination knob so it’s a little hard to turn. I also prefer numbers or another type of visual indicator for distance…but the Strike Eagle starts off with 20 and then some differently spaced hash marks until infinite. Strike Eagle Magnification Ring Magnification ring was nice and smooth but also on the heavier side…you’re not going to be switching magnifications quickly. Fit & Feel Overall fit and feel is good.  It’s still a Vortex after all. Here’s a quick video of me going over the scope: Mounting I went with 30mm Warne Extended Mount which were easy to install and held zero even when I was taking the scope on and off a couple times. Tracking Test How did it go? It was one of my first tests so I made sure to reconfirm zero…that’s why there’s two holes in the center. Strike Eagle Tracking Test This was done at 100 yards with my DTA SRS which is at least a half-MOA rifle (will shoot under 1/2 an inch at 100 yards). Overall very good…all the shots are within the red squares. Other Features Comes with an illuminated reticle…but it goes from 0-11 without OFF positions next to each number. It works. Keep in mind that illuminated reticles are not daylight bright…you use them during dusk or dawn. Summary Great entry point long range scope with decent glass…despite some side distortion at higher magnifications, stiff knobs, and not my personal favorite reticle. MOST AFFORDABLE Vortex Optics 4-24x50 Strike Eagle 395 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 395 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing 2. Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50 "Glass Clarity &" ; Reticle The Viper PST II is definitely clearer than the Strike Eagle. Vortex Viper PST II 5-25x It’s like when I moved up from the Strike Eagle 1-6x to the PST II 1-6x for my current competition rifle. F1 Firearms Upper with Vortex PST II Let’s start with 5x magnification of its EBR-2C reticle… Vortex Viper PST II 5x It’s a little thin so you might lose it depending on your target and background. But since it is first focal plane (FFP)…at 25x the reticle gets grows. Vortex Viper PST II 25x The reticle is Vortex’s EBR-2C and it’s a little busy for me. EBR-2C Reticle But I totally get that it’s for holdovers, ranging, and windage corrections.  I’m not there yet in my long range shooting skills so it might very well be the best thing ever. "Eye Relief &" ; Eye Box Vortex Viper PST II Mounted Eye relief is listed at 3.4 inches but feels better maybe since the glass is more premium. Eyebox is also more forgiving compared to the Strike Eagle. Elevation & Windage Knobs Now we’re talking! I’m a snob for nice knobs . Viper PST II Knobs And the PST II has got them…crisp clicks with the perfect amount of resistance…and audible too. There’s zero stop (so you can’t dial it under sight-in zero) and some fiber optic for a more visual confirmation. Parallax & Magnification Finally…the PST II has numbers for parallax.  They matched up nicely too with the ranges I shot.  Also smooth to adjust. Magnification was also easy to adjust with a nice quality feel. Viper PST II Magnification Ring Fit & Feel Finish is identical to the Strike Eagle but the PST II is a little longer…plus with all the nicer amenities missing on the Strike Eagle. Take a look at the nice tactile windage/elevation adjustments. Vortex Viper PST II 5-25x Here’s a quick video: Mounting I went with a Midwest Industries 30mm Quick Disconnect Mount which might be my favorite so far. Easy to install and super easy to take on/off…with good zeroing. My PST II came with Vortex Cantilever Mounts …but it didn’t fit my DTA rails although were fine on my mil-spec AR-15 receivers. "Vortex Cantilever Mounts" Tracking Test I lost track of stuff here… Vortex PST II Tracking Test So you can see where I goofed with only going halfway to the right direction. It’s a decent test although I would have liked to see the top two segments be inside the red. Other Features Comes with illuminated reticle AND with off buttons next to each level. Summary The PST II is what I would have wanted to fix up in the Strike Eagle…and Vortex has done it. It’s what I used the most at a long range event. HBH Going Long Distance To hit 1000 and 1250 yards. HBH 1000 and 1250 Yards Of course it’s at more of a premium. But if you’re ready to seriously go after 1000+ shots you can’t do wrong with the Viper. Vortex Optics Viper PST Gen II EBR-2C 5-25x50 999 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 999 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 3. Leupold VX3i LRP 8.5-25×50 Boom!  Now we’re onto another well known company in the scope game…Leupold with their LRP 8.5-25x . Leupold VX3i LRP 8.5-25x Glass Clarity &; Reticle Clarity is good… Leupold LRP 8.5x Though at higher magnifications it was hard to get a well-lit picture. Leupold LRP 25x Reticle is second focal plane but very usable at all magnifications. Eye Relief &; Eye Box I’m really bummed to say it but I didn’t like it as much as even the Strike Eagle (at half the price) in terms of eye relief and eye box. Eye relief was quite good with 5.3 in at low magnifications and 3.7 at high.  You can see how much more forward it is on my rail. Leupold LRP Mounted It was hard to get a well-lit picture since the eye box was not as forgiving. Especially at high magnification I found my eyes getting fatigued during the zeroing and tracking test. Elevation & Windage Knobs Leupold LRP Knobs The clicks are pretty large in terms of travel distance…you’re going to need to turn a lot more for each mil of adjustment. But they felt nice in squishy but good kind of way.  Audible but not too loud either. Windage (left to right) is capped on the right side. I personally don’t like that since it makes it harder to adjust on the fly…but it protects your zero if you’re moving around and most of the time you’re probably holding for wind anyways. Parallax & Magnification The parallax knob is a series of different sized dots ending with an infinite sign.  I like numbers better but I’m glad at least there’s a visual confirmation of roughly where you are (instead of just hash marks) The magnification ring has an integrated throw lever which makes it very easy to change magnifications. Leupold LRP Magnification Ring Fit & Feel Overall it still looks and feels quality and is pretty light for its stats. Mounting Leupold VX3i LRP 8.5-25x I used a Leupold cantilever single piece mount which was easy to install but I wish there was a different knob on the base so I could more easily use my torque wrench. Tracking Test Leupold LRP Tracking Test This one wasn’t the best one even after taking out that messup at the top left square. Summary Not my favorite at the price point.  I would say get the Strike Eagle or up it a little to get the PST II or some of the other ones down the list. Gave me some eye fatigue due to the eye box despite pretty good eye relief. Leupold VX-3i LRP 8.5-25x50 900 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 900 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) "Palmetto State Armory" (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 4. Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56 Redemption!  I really like Leupold’s Mark 5HD scope. Leupold Mark 5HD But then again…I might just like nice things.  This is one of Leupold’s newest creations and comes in over $2000. Glass Clarity &; Reticle Great glass clarity at all magnifications.  I got the version with the CCH reticle but there’s plenty of choices. Leupold CCH Reticle Here it is at 5x…I like how the three skinny triangles bring your eyes toward the center.  The reticle is a little thin at 5x but if you’re using this…you’re probably zoomed in at least a little. Leupold Mark 5HD 5x Here it is at 25x magnification. Leupold Mark 5HD 25x It’s a lot of stuff that hunters and military will use for wind and moving target holds.  Plus the CCH reticle is optimized at 12-16x magnification for night vision and thermal attachments. More than I need for my purposes! Eye Relief &; Eye Box Listed at 3.6 inch for 25x and 3.8 inch for 5x…so it’s pretty standard.  You can see it’s actually a little closer to my eyes when mounted than other scopes. Leupold Mark 5HD Mounted Eye box is forgiving and a joy to look through when coupled with the great glass and 56mm objective lens that lets in a lot of light compared to the 50mm’s from before. Elevation & Windage Knobs Leupold Mark 5HD Turrets There’s a nice locking button that protrudes out for zero stop.  That mechanism also disappears after one full turn…and then a metal pin on top comes out after 2 full turns. This is a scope that’s made for low light use when you have to use tactile indicators for zero. Turning the turret knobs is soft/easy and there’s a good audible click. Windage is covered which is ok since it’s coupled with the CCH reticle that helps a lot with holdovers. Mark 5HD Offset Windage The indicator for windage is not centered…but instead more at the top.  It does make it easier to see but is different from almost all other scopes…so it takes some getting used to. Parallax & Magnification Parallax was very close to the actual distances and I like the numbered graduations. Leupold Mark 5HD Magnification Ring And it comes with an integrated throw lever that makes it easy to transition the entire zoom spectrum. Fit & Feel Very quality and actually lighter than I thought for all the features and the bigger tube/objective lens. Mounting Leupold Mark 5HD I used the very high 34mm rings from Leupold which worked better on my DTA SRS.  However one set of the rings had a very sticky screw that needed a little more oomph to manipulate. I still like going with single piece mounts since I take my scopes on and off a lot and they hold zeros better. Tracking Test Tracking was dead on even though the zero shifted a little from taking the rings on and off. Leupold Mark 5HD Tracking Test Summary Overall super clear glass and extra features built into the great windage/elevation knobs. You might choose a more “normal” reticle like their TMR since the CCH is built for movers and windage holds. Lives up to the Leupold name. Leupold Mark 5HD Rifle Scope, 5-25x56mm 2200 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 2200 at EuroOptic Compare prices (2 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. Burris XTR II 5-25×50 The Burris XTR II is a pretty good deal for what you get coming in around $1000. Burris XTR II 5-25x Glass Clarity &; Reticle This bad boy comes with very decent glass and one of my favorite reticles…the SCR Mil which is an enhanced “normal” reticle. Burris SCR Mil Check it out at 25x which is very usable and has good graduations for both windage and elevation holds. Burris XTR II 25x While still being useful at 5x, especially with the 3 thicker lines drawing your eyes into the center. Burris XTR II 5x Eye Relief &; Eye Box Eye relief is listed at a good 4.24 and 3.5 inches although the eye box did not feel very forgiving. Mounted Burris XTR II Elevation & Windage Knobs The turrets/knobs were a little stiffer than I would have liked…but were plenty tactile. Burris XTR II Knobs And very personal knock…but I don’t like the harder-to-read-than-needed font for the numbers.  And the inclusion of +10 numbers on elevation above the regular numbers makes it very busy. Parallax & Magnification Parallax is easy to adjust and has numbers. Plus illumination goes from 1 through 11 with each one next to an off. Fit & Feel Overall very nicely built. Check out the turrets in action: Mounting I used the Burris PEPR mount which is great for the money but is heavy.  However it does include Picatinny rails for offset red dots. Burris XTR II 5-25x Tracking Test Burris XTR II Tracking Test Tracking was ok and somehow I was shooting not that great. Summary A good option if you’re trying to stay under $1000 with good glass and can live with the slightly less than ideal eye box and stiff/busy turrets. Burris XTR2 5-25x50mm 1100 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at EuroOptic Compare prices (3 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 6. Steiner PX4i 4-16×56 Let’s get some German glass up in here with the Steiner PX4i . Steiner P4Xi 4-16x I love their 1-4x scope and their 4-16x is one of the nicest pieces of glass I’ve had the pleasure to looking through. Glass Clarity &; Reticle Since it’s less magnification, a smaller ratio (4-16x vs 5-25x), 56mm objective lens…AND it’s Steiner…the glass is super clear and bright. Coupled with their SCR reticle which was developed for precision use…you’ll be ready for any long range task. Steiner SCR Reticle Here it is at 16x magnification.  This is definitely one of those cases where the picture does not do the actual optic justice. Steiner P4Xi 16x And at 4x.  Thing but usable especially with the draw-in sides. Steiner P4Xi 4x Eye Relief &; Eye Box Eye relief is a generous 4 inch and eye box is very forgiving. Steiner P4Xi Mounted Elevation & Windage Knobs Great feeling turrets…stiffer in a good way and more tactile than others.  Can definitely be used at night. Steiner P4Xi Knobs Plus that white circle turns green when you pass one full rotation. Windage is exposed and is slightly easier to turn but same great quality feeling. Parallax & Magnification Parallax starts at 50 and uses a volume-like control to denote distance.  Makes sense and I can probably get used to it as opposed to numbers. Magnification ring feels quality and decently easy to turn with about 2 large cranks to reach min and max. Fit & Feel Looks and feels great.  It’s decently short with a thicker tube (34mm) and larger objective lens (56mm). Mounting The Steiner mount is kick-ass! Steiner P4Xi 4-16x Super quality feeling and comes with a built-in bubble level. Tracking Test Pretty consistent here although I would have liked all of them to be on the left edge like the zero-ing shots. Steiner P4xi Tracking Test Summary If you’re looking for a super quality feeling and looking optic that’s battle-tested…you can’t go wrong with this Steiner. Plus if you’re worried about mirage the 4-16x is perfect. Steiner Optics P4Xi 4-16x56mm SCR Scope x 40mm at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 7. EOTech Vudu 5-25×56 EOTech’s foray into long distance gives us the Vudu 5-25x . EOTech Vudu 5-25x We love our EOTech Holographic Sights and this super short scope is perfect if you’re looking to rock night vision or thermal devices on your rifle. Glass Clarity &; Reticle You’re probably giving something up by going so short…check it out below 4th from the left. Tested Long Range Scopes But so far I can’t tell because the glass is great. It uses a pretty standard MRAD reticle. EOTech Vudu 25x That’s great at both 5 and 25x. EOTech Vudu 5x Eye Relief &; Eye Box Eye relief is listed at 3.6 inches so you’re not bashing your eye with magnums. EOTech Vudu Mounted And eye box wasn’t a problem for me to get a nice sight picture at any magnification. Elevation & Windage Knobs A nice but also kind of annoying feature is the lock feature on the elevation turret. EOTech Vudu Knobs You’ve got to remember to pull the turret up in order to turn it…and there’s not much of an indicator when it’s on or off. However turns are nice and solid with an audible quality click.  Windage is capped. Parallax & Magnification Parallax has numbers which I appreciate and dead-on with my 100 and 600 yard known distances. EOTech Vudu Magnification Ring Magnification is super easy to turn…but it’s the entire rear of the scope so if you have attached scope caps…it’s not going to be fun.  Might be why it comes with clear bungee covers. Fit & Feel Feels super quality in its compact form. Here’s everything in action: Mounting Has a 34mm tube and I used my go-to Aero Precision Lightweight mounts to keep everything together. Tracking Test Pretty good results here and I’m glad I’m shooting a little better than the previous! EOTech "Vudu Tracking Test" Summary The go-to if you want something super short and compact.  Either just because or if you need to attach some serious electronics to the end of it. SHORTEST 5-25X EOTECH Vudu 5-25x50 1600 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1600 at EuroOptic Compare prices (3 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 8. Primary Arms 6-30×56 Wait…PA is on the list? Primary Arms 6-30x PLx Well turns out they don’t just make very bang-for-the-buck scopes ( Best 1-6x Scopes ), but also have entered the premium area with their Japanese glass-ed PLx 6-30x . Glass Clarity &; Reticle Glass is very clear and bright with its 56mm objective lens. However…I’m not in love with its DEKA Mil reticle. DEKA Reticle It’s very usable at 6x. Primary Arms 6x But then becomes kind of big at 30x. Primary Arms 30x If you’re aiming at torso sized targets it’s fine but anything smaller might be hard with those giant futurist hash marks.  The chevron center also takes some getting used to. *Update* : Looks like other people like me have been heard…there’s no more DEKA reticle. Much bigger fan of the Athena version. Primary Arms Athena Reticle Eye Relief &; Eye Box Eye relief is 3.3 inch to 4 inch so it’s pretty normal. Primary Arms 6-30x Mounted I found the eye box to be pretty forgiving too even at the max 30 magnification. Elevation & Windage Knobs Very nice big knob with quality subdued-sound clicks. Primary Arms 6-30x Knobs Windage turrets are slightly stiffer but have the same feel quality. Parallax & Magnification Parallax is a little hidden with the illumination knobs (yes, they have an off next to each setting) but has numbers that are graduated nicely.  Also on the dot with my known distances of 100 and 600 yards. Magnification ring has a smaller integrated fin that helps a lot with adjustment. Fit & Feel Good heft and quality finish.  PA is really stepping up their game. Mounting Primary Arms 6-30x Again I went with an "Aero Precision Lightweight" mount but if you purchase from PA you’ll usually get a free mount too. Tracking Test Pretty good! Primary Arms 6-30x Tracking Test Summary If you want some quality Japanese glass on a scope that could probably cost 2x what it does now…try the PLx out. It has Primary Arms’ lifetime warranty like all their other stuff. BEST BANG-FOR-THE-BUCK Primary Arms PLX Series 6-30X56mm 1499 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1499 at Primary Arms Compare prices (2 found) Primary Arms (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 9. Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25×56 Ooh…the big boy S&B PMII is here. Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25x Almost universally known as the best of the best…it’s used by some of the top police and military units (hence the PM) in the world. It’s also around $3000. Glass Clarity & Reticle Subjectively the best to me and my buddies who rock them.  Closest would be Steiner and US Optics. There’s also tons of reticles to choose from…I just happen to have the H2CMR which is close to a basic Mil with circles that make it easy to count how much to hold/correct. H2CMR Reticle The first focal plane (FFP) reticle is thin but usable at 5x. Schmidt & Bender PMII 5x But shines at 25x. Schmidt & Bender PMII 25x Normally it’s pretty hard to get a well-lit picture at max magnification…but it was definitely easier with the PMII. Also no side distortion! Eye Relief & Eye Box Schmidt & Bender PMII Mounted Eye relief is average with 3.5 inches but eye box is pretty forgiving even at 25x.  That also helps in getting a nice picture. Elevation & Windage Knobs Schmidt & Bender PMII Turrets I’ve cranked on these since 2012 and they are the same since the day I got them…crisp with the perfect amount of resistance.  Also down to .1 mrad per click for refined. Also the white open rectangles at the top of the elevation ring change to orange after one full rotation.  Oh…and of course zero stop too. Windage is exposed and has the same feeling as elevation. Parallax & Magnification The giant parallax knob is super smooth and uninhibited by an illumination lever since there’s very few times where it’s actually useful.  Also dead on for my known distances. Magnification ring is smooth and easy to use.  Plus there’s a nice little “sharks-fin” attachment you can get for a better throw. Schmidt & Bender PMII Magnification Fit & Feel Tons of use and I’m only starting to see some scuff marks at the edges of the turrets.  If it’s good enough for USMC sniper teams…it’s good enough for me. Mounting Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25x I use a Larue OBR mount which has kept within .5 MOA over countless on and off across multiple rifles.  This setup is my go-to for AR-15 accuracy tests so it’s been…around. Tracking Test Pretty good…all within the red boxes.  Although I must admit I’m SO DONE with tracking tests. Schmidt & Bender PMII Tracking Test Summary If you want my personal best of the best…here it is.  Hands-down. EDITOR'S PICK Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25x56 H2CMR 3200 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 3200 at EuroOptic Compare prices (2 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What’s your take on the PMII if price were no object? Readers' Ratings 4.97/5 (853) Your Rating? Honorable Mentions This is only a slice of what’s out there…and I intend to keep testing and updating ! Here’s some of my other favorites I’ve tried but don’t have in hand for a more in-dpeth review: Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56 FFP Most Versatile Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27x56 FFP 2500 at Rainier Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 2500 at Rainier Arms Compare prices (2 found) Rainier Arms (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Nightforce ATACR 5-25×56 Nightforce is another manufacturer known for high-quality glass…and the ATACR is its premier line.  I have and love their NXS line but mine is only 2.5-10x.  I really want to try their 5-25x. Nightforce 5-25x ATACR 2300 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 2300 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing U.S. Optics B-25 5-25x The U.S. Optics B-25 has a simple, sleek aesthetic, and that simplicity extends to its controls. Plus it’s one of the few scopes to rival Schmidt & Bender in glass quality. U.S. Optics B-25 5-25x 3022 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 3022 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Leupold Mark 8 3.5-25×56 M5B2 Illuminated Front Focal Best Illuminated Reticle Scope Leupold Mark 8 3.5-25x56 M5B2 "Illuminated Front Focal" 4700 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 4700 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Conclusion BLM Precision Shooting To recap… My recommended budget optic for those of you entering the long range game is the Strike Eagle 4-24x. MOST AFFORDABLE Vortex Optics 4- "24x50 Strike Eagle" 395 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 395 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing If you want to step it up a little…get the Viper PST II 5-25x. "Vortex Optics Viper" PST Gen II EBR-2C 5-25x50 999 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 999 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing If you want to up your game a little more with Leupold… Leupold Mark 5HD Rifle Scope, 5-25x56mm 2200 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 2200 at EuroOptic Compare prices (2 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Want super clear German glass and not need the full 5-25x magnification? Steiner Optics P4Xi 4-16x56mm SCR Scope x 40mm at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Need to go short and add in some night vision or thermal…without losing much in performance? SHORTEST 5-25X EOTECH Vudu 5-25x50 1600 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1600 at EuroOptic Compare prices (3 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing How about some Japanese glass from the most worth-it optics manufacturer? BEST BANG-FOR-THE-BUCK Primary Arms PLX Series 6-30X56mm 1499 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1499 at Primary Arms Compare prices (2 found) Primary Arms (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Or…simply want the best of the best? EDITOR'S PICK Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25x56 H2CMR 3200 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 3200 at EuroOptic Compare prices (2 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing That does it for me for now .  Let me know what other scopes I’ve missed so I can try to get them for Round 2! If yIf you’re looking for something strictly AR-15…our Best AR-15 Optics covers everything imaginable.  Or if you’re into hunting, scout scopes, prisms or more…check out our overall Best Rifle Scopes article. A Couple AR-15 Optics

Female Self Defense: 7 Weapons You Need to Survive

Self defense for women is a vital consideration for every female’s survival as well as an important part of your “Everyday Carry”.  Here are five weapons you need to have with you at all times. Keep in mind that a weapon is always not ideal since it takes time to get it out of your purse, bag, vehicle, etc. We highly recommend learning proper self-defense techniques with your body. For that reason, we recommend the following book below: #1 Book #1 Book The Self Defense Guide #1 Most DEVASTATING Self-Defense Technique Ever Developed Written by former CIA officer Learn "The Trident" technique for self-defense Get Your Copy Now Now let’s get into the weapons that can help in such situations: 1. Strike Pen : This product is amazing. It is a pen on one side and a powerful tungsten tip that can really hurt someone if used as a weapon. It’s perfect to put in your bag, purse, wallet, etc. It’s not suspicious so you can have it in your hand and not “freak” normal people out while walking. Highly recommended! SurvivalCache.com Special : We partnered with the manufacture to give away a limited supply of these Strike Pens. Once supplies are gone, we will not replenish them. We just ask you to pay for shipping and handling to get it to your home. Claim the offer here . 2. Brass Knuckles : a common self-defense tool that is easy to use. It is easy to grip this tool as you pull it out of your bag, or in your car. You can check out this Blackout Brass Knuckle product that we recommend. They are being given away for free as a self-defense awareness campaign; you just have to pay for shipping. Grab the product here . 3. Ninja Spike Keychain (aka 'kubotan') : This weapon is intimidating and usually comes with an attachment for your key chain. The Ninja Spike fits perfect in between your fingers as you make a fist. I always grip this spike as I am walking to and from my vehicle. If there is someone up to no good and they see you gripping this weapon, chances are they will pick someone else to prey on. If they don’t happen to notice it and you are attacked, a quick punch in the eye with this will definitely make them let go so that you can flee. In a pinch, you can also grip your largest key between two fingers and use in the same manner, but keys are not as easy to use.  The Ninja Spike key chain is perfect for leaving a permanent tattoo on your attacker. Armory Replicas Street Smart Self Defense Spike Keychain Black See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 10:28 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 4. Honeycomb Hairbrush by Cold Steel – This is by far one of my favorite weapons! This is truly a functional hairbrush and it is so innocent looking that no one would ever think that the “brush” part pulls off to reveal a 3 1/2” dagger. This brush is made from Zytel (a stiff nylon fiberglass composite). Keep in mind that this is a dagger meant for stabbing, not a knife used for slashing so you have to have enough strength to thrust this into an attacker.  Ladies, this also comes in handy if you get a bad haircut. 5. Paracord Monkey Fist (aka“Monkey Ball”) – The first time I saw this I didn’t know what to think. It just looked like a cute key chain. Then, I swung it against a counter and realized how much damage this could do. It may look like a toy, but it most certainly is not. The Monkey Fist has a steel ball bearing wrapped in that paracord and would most certainly inflict serious damage if swung at a perpetrator’s head or even body.  If you connect with this monkey…someone is going down. 6. Open Assist Knife – This knife will open easily with a quick movement of your thumb as opposed to a conventional pocket knife.  The ease of only having to use one hand is extremely important should you find yourself in an emergency situation, making this a good choice for an EDC (everyday carry ) This is not a switchblade, as switchblades are illegal in most states.  Most states allow you to carry a knife with a blade up to 3”. It is wise to review your local state laws to determine if the knife you plan to carry is legal.  Bottom line, when someone sees that you have a knife…they know you mean business and no one wants to get cut. Check our our guide on the best folding survival knives . 7. MACE, Pepper Spray, (or the hottest) Bear Spray – Most everyone is aware of mace/pepper spray.  It is one of the most popular self-defense items that people purchase because it is non-lethal and you do not have to have direct contact with your assailant.  When purchasing mace/pepper spray, make sure you get good law enforcement or military-grade one.  I recommend UDAP because it is designed to stop Grizzly Bears and any other mammal smaller than 1000 lbs.  There are a few states that restrict mace/pepper spray and you can usually find the restrictions on any website that sells it.  Hit someone in the eyes with this and you will magically disappear from their view.  Not to mention that the cops will not have a hard time finding the attacker, look for the blind guy walking around like Frankenstein. Let me conclude by saying I personally am a supporter of people carrying handguns and tasers for self-defense. This is only to serve as a very introductory article for those who may not currently be carrying any kind of weapon at all.  All of these items fit easily into a purse and generally do not require a license or permit to carry.  Always ensure that any item you carry for self-defense does not conflict with any local regulations. Lastly, to wrap-up, a weapon can only go so far. Can you always grab the weapon? Most likely no. It’s always best to learn quick techniques in self-defense. The book below is highly recommend and written by an ex-CIA officer: #1 Book #1 Book "The Self Defense" Guide #1 Most DEVASTATING Self- "Defense Technique Ever" Developed Written by former CIA officer Learn "The Trident" technique for self-defense "Get Your Copy" Now Photo credits: Spyderco Knives, UDAP, Cold Steel Knives, hearldpost Other interesting articles: Female Self Defense: Situational Awareness Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network vs USCCA: CCW Insurance Comparison 10 Tips Everyone Should Know Before Carrying Concealed in 2020 6 Tools to Survive Anything

Summary

The single most important factor in precision shooting is consistency. The best way to develop consistency is repetition. If you don’t own an indoor range or live in the desert, how are you going to get your repetition? How can you shoot every day? The answer is the Next Level Training Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger (SIRT) Training Pistol.